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hannah 18 NE England

Slowly becoming more obsessed with twenty one pilots every day

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2nd Sep 2014 with 477588 notes | via | source
a-caloufornia-stateofmind:

One of the best responses I’ve seen to Nicki’s performance so far

a-caloufornia-stateofmind:

One of the best responses I’ve seen to Nicki’s performance so far

our-forelsket:

msrmoony:

Harry Potter au where Harry didn’t lose being a parsletongue and Albus buys a snake as a pet one year because snakes are cool and one day just walks in on Harry and the snake having a deep conversation

Albus is 17 and loses his virginity in his room and forgets the snake talks to his dad and when Harry gets home the snake is all like OH MY GOSH YOU’D NEVER GUESSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS WHAT HAPPENED

2nd Sep 2014 with 35319 notes | via | source

oitnb + text posts

2nd Sep 2014 with 76998 notes | via | source

supernova2395:

There are two types of people in Britain:

image

and

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There is no inbetween.

1st Sep 2014 with 1212 notes | via | source

notmattsmith:

nine: don’t wander off

ten: don’t wander off

eleven: don’t wander off

twelve: 

image

1st Sep 2014 with 29058 notes | via | source

we’re broken people l-/

mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make a study schedule.

  1. Make a reference sheet with separate lists for each subject. This reference sheet is used to orient your daily studying.
  2. List the material you need to study for each subject. Be more specific than you would be on a study schedule and make sure you put down everything you need to go over.
  3. On your schedule, highlight the exam dates and deadlines and put down any relevant information.
  4. Using your reference sheet, assign certain material to go through each day.

Scheduling tips

  • If you haven’t been working on study material throughout the semester; schedule days before your study leave to work on study sheets for revision, flash cards, summaries, whatever you use to study. 
  • Take a day to gather your study material before your study leave begins. Like the weekend classes end or so. This will save you a lot of time when you sit down to study every day.
  • Schedule your studying so that you start studying for the last final first, and the first final last. Make sure you start this early enough to give yourself time to revise for the subjects you need to.
  • If you have a day between each of your finals, take the night of the final off and revise for the next exam the day after. If not, take the couple of hours after your exam off then revise for the next one.
  • Schedule the harder/heavier material in a subject first, so that you work on that material when you have more energy.
  • If you’re taking subjects that you have difficulty with, or subjects with a heavy workload; schedule catch up days. However, don’t let that encourage you to slack off. Try to stick to your schedule and only rely on the catch up days if you really need to, and if you don’t; then it’s a day off!
  • Also, schedule days off… a day or if you can’t afford it, half a day. I can’t stress how important it is to take time for yourself, it’ll help you avoid burnout. 

Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making study schedules since I started college. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.

I’m sorry I’m posting this by the end of the year when a lot of people are already done with exams, but perhaps it’ll be helpful for people taking summer courses now? And also for next year :)

31st Aug 2014 with 32373 notes | via | source